Mar
21
5:30 PM17:30

March AEG Dinner Meeting

Topic:       A Tale of Two Waste Sites

Speaker:  Deborah Green - Jahns Lecturer, Geologist Writer

Time:

5:30 – Social Hour
6:30 – Dinner
7:30 – Presentation

Place:        Best Western Executive Inn, 200 Taylor Avenue North, Seattle, WA 98109, 206-448-9444

Abstract:

Once upon a time, decades ago, before many an environmental regulation was promulgated, a consulting geologist was contracted to evaluate a site for development as a low-level radioactive waste facility. The geologist summarized the regional and site-specific geology and hydrology. In his report, based on what he’d researched and observed, he discussed potential consequences depending on how the facility would be operated. If waste containers were emplaced in a manner that maintained their integrity and the trenches were covered when not actively in use, the geologist surmised the site had a high probability of functioning safely and effectively. In that case, the possibility of leachate accumulating within the trenches, resulting in perched water tens of feet higher in elevation than the regional groundwater level, would be minimized. Unfortunately, the tale of that waste site is fictional.

The non-fictional waste site’s story has the same opening chapter, but the operational constraints outlined by the geologist were not followed. The site received and co-disposed low-level radioactive wastes and those that would later be classified as hazardous wastes in a total of 52 trenches. Waste containers haphazardly filled the trenches, were breached as they settled, and precipitation collected. Indeed, the warnings in the geologist’s report were correct. Leachate formed in the trenches resulting in numerous contaminants, from tritium (which migrated at the same rate as water itself) to complex organic compounds (which underwent retardation, but still impacted the surrounding environment), flowing from the site in a newly-created shallow, perched water zone, years later daylighting on the hillsides and in the creeks down gradient of the site. This waste site’s last chapter was written in a Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study when it was listed as a Superfund site. We’ll talk about how more sites can have happy endings, when the story the geology tells is heeded.

Speaker Bio:

Deborah Green was born in Queens, New York, and traveled and camped throughout the United States and Canada with her family during her childhood summers, doing much of her growing up in the National Parks. She’s been a Westerner all her life, it just took her 39 years to get home. She now makes her homes in a passive solar adobe house at the north end of the Sandia Mountains in New Mexico and on a sailboat in British Columbia during the summers. In both places, she spends much of her time outdoors.

Deborah’s earth science teacher father informally taught her geology on their summer adventures and she fell in love with it. She holds geology degrees from the University of Rochester and Texas A&M University. She worked as an environmental and engineering geologist for 30 years in more than 35 states, with 20 of those years as a self-employed consultant. Active in the Association of Environmental and Engineering Geologists, a professional organization, Deborah has mentored many young professionals and championed the Norman R. Tilford Field Studies scholarships. The scholarships support students learning geology in the field. They are named in honor of Deborah’s late husband, an internationally-recognized engineering geologist, who died in a small plane crash on his way to lead a student field trip in 1997.

Having written poetry as a girl, she rediscovered her love for creative writing after establishing herself in her professional career. She’s written a poetry chapbook, Each Bed of Stone, and co-authored a book of poetry in dialogue with two other poets titled Triologue. Her first novel is loosely based on a period in her late husband’s life when he was working as the Chief Foundation Geologist for a large dam in East Central Turkey from the late 1960’s to the early 1970’s. Deborah was a Finalist in the 2015 Faulkner-Wisdom Novel-In-Progress Contest. She is currently revising the novel, as well as working on several shorter pieces.

As the GeologistWriter, Deborah strives to understand and convey the wonder of the landscape and the complexity of earth processes while also exploring the mysterious terrain of the human heart and relationships through compelling stories and essays.

RSVP by Friday March 15th at 4pm! https://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/4106999

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Feb
21
5:30 PM17:30

February AEG Dinner Meeting

Topic:       The Oso Landslide: Why It Was So Destructive and What Initiated It  

Speaker:  Rupert G. Tart, Jr., PE, DGE, LMASCE       

Time:

5:30 – Social Hour
6:30 – Dinner
7:30 – Presentation

Place:        Best Western Executive Inn, 200 Taylor Avenue North, Seattle, WA 98109, 206-448-9444

Abstract:

The damage during the Oso Landslide was extensive and immediate.  There were 2 distinct slides.  The first generated a splash so big that mud was thrown 4000 ft from the splash site.  43 people were instantly fatally injured.  At least two people were buried and yet survived for many hours before being rescued. The slide was likely initiated by ground freezing at the west side of the slide scarp. The author has been studying and photographing (mostly from the air) the Oso site since 2002 and will present his rational for his opinions of what happened and why it happened.     

Speaker Bio:

Rupert (Bucky) Tart has over 45 years’ experience as a geotechnical engineer. He received  a BCE  degree from the University of Virginia in 1965 and a MSCE degree from West Virginia University in 1966. Most of his career was spent in Alaska where, for more than 40 years, he has provided geotechnical consultation on slopes and numerous other issues to the constructors and operators of the Trans Alaska Pipeline. He has also conducted major landslide repair investigations and studies for the Alaska Department of Transportation, the City of Kodiak, and several mining companies. He has published papers and a book chapter on slope issues, focusing on those related to  groundwater  and  ground  freezing issues. He is an avid photographer and pilot and has frequently combined these skills with the analyses of slopes, landslides, and other geotechnical issues. Since 2002  he  has  been monitoring the Oso Landslide site.

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Jan
17
5:30 PM17:30

January AEG Dinner Meeting

Topic: Tsunamis past and future: tsunami deposits and simulations along the Salish Sea coastline of Washington State

Speaker: Carrie Garrison-Laney – University of Washington

Time: 5:30 – Social Hour

6:30 – Dinner

7:30 – Presentation

Place: Best Western Executive Inn, 200 Taylor Avenue North, Seattle, WA 98109, 206-448-9444

Presentation Abstract:

The Salish Sea inner coastline of Washington State, which includes the urban waterfronts of Seattle, Tacoma, and Everett, has tidal marshes that record past tsunamis as anomalous sand layers in peaty marsh deposits. While Washington has other tsunami sources, Cascadia tsunamis are the most likely source of deposits from tidal marsh sites at Discovery Bay on the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and at Lynch Cove at the head of Hood Canal. GeoClaw simulations of four different Cascadia tsunamis show wave amplification at both sites, while simulations of tsunamis from the Seattle fault does not. Simulations of an Alaska-Aleutian tsunami predict flooding at both sites, but high-resolution radiocarbon ages of the deposits agree best with land and marine records of Cascadia earthquakes. The tsunami history along Washington’s inner coastline continues to be refined with new geologic evidence from additional sites, and the hazards are becoming better understood through new high-resolution tsunami modeling of the Mw 9.0 “L1” Cascadia earthquake scenario. The L1 is a hypothetical earthquake with a surface-rupturing splay fault that amplifies tsunami generation, and is currently being used for the next generation of tsunami inundation maps in Washington State. These maps will identify areas with the greatest hazard, and will be important for the maritime community, shoreline planning, and coastal risk assessment.

Speaker Bio:

Dr. Carrie Garrison-Laney is a tsunami hazards expert at Washington Sea Grant and liaison to the National Center for Tsunami Research at the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle. Her graduate research focused on paleotsunami deposits at intertidal marsh sites around the Salish Sea, and included numerical modeling of tsunamis, a study of marine and intertidal diatom evidence for tsunami and sea level change, and radiocarbon dating of the timing of inundation events. Carrie’s interests include tsunami science, scientific communication, and education. Carrie participates in a variety of outreach activities, including Washington’s annual Tsunami Roadshow. She has earned a bachelor’s degree in Geosciences from San Francisco State University; a master’s degree in Environmental Systems from Humboldt State University; a master’s degree in Human Centered Design and Engineering from the University of Washington; and a Ph.D. in Earth and Space Sciences from the University of Washington.

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Dec
12
5:30 PM17:30

December AEG Holiday Party

Will will be hosting another fun AEG Holiday Party this year! Get those fun 5-10 minute presentations ready, folks! There will also be an optional white elephant gift exchange. Lastly, but not least, we will be collecting food (and monetary) donations for the holiday season.

When: WEDNESDAY December 12th, 2018 at 5:30pm.

Where: Pyramid Alehouse - Seattle

1201 1st Ave S, Seattle, WA 98134

Tickets not yet available.

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Nov
15
5:30 PM17:30

November AEG+ASCE Joint Dinner Meeting

The November joint ASCE + AEG dinner meeting will be held on Thursday, November 15, 2018.  Ben Leshchinsky from Oregon State University will be presenting Will it Stay or Will it Go?: Use of LiDAR to Assess Slop Instability.

Tickets available online: https://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3798942

When:  Thursday, November 15th, 2018
- 5:30 pm - Social Hour
- 6:30 pm - Dinner
- 7:30 pm - Presentation

Where:
Best Western Executive Inn
200 Taylor Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109
Map: https://goo.gl/maps/Brhq44oUBrR2

Presentation Abstract:         

Light detection and ranging technology, or lidar, is a promising tool for assessing unstable ground due to its resolution, accuracy, and the ability to process away visual obstacles, such as vegetation. In particular, laser scanning has significant utility when applied repeatedly over time, quantifying changes in terrain that may not be easily discernable to the eye. This presentation will touch on some ongoing research that employs lidar for (1) regional landslide inventorying and landslide susceptibility, and (2) quantifying coastal retreat and its influence on landslide movements. A semi-automated approach that uses lidar to recognize geomorphic features and supplement manual landslide inventorying is presented. Thereafter, an approach that uses landslide inventories to leverage region-specific, shallow landslide susceptibility is considered. An ongoing collection of lidar along the Oregon Coastline is used to better capture coastal erosion and its influence on slope instability. The increasing availability of lidar presents us with a unique opportunity to better assess the risk stemming from geohazards, enhance asset management, and understand geomorphic and geologic processes at a more refined level.

Speaker Bio:

Ben Leshchinsky is an associate professor in geotechnical engineering at Oregon State University. The primary focus of Bens research is on basic and applied geomechanics, soil reinforcement, slope stability, and in recent years, use of remote sensing technologies applied towards assessment of natural hazards. Ben received his BS from the University of Delaware in 2007, and his MS and PhD from Columbia University in 2008 and 2012, respectively. Ben is a registered professional engineer in Oregon, an editorial board member of both the ASCE Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering and Geotextiles and Geomembranes. He is the recipient of 2018 International Geosynthetics Society Young Member Achievement Award, the 2016 International Landslide Symposium Young Paper Award, among other awards for research and teaching.

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Oct
18
5:30 PM17:30

October AEG Dinner Meeting

Topic: Surface Fault Rupture Hazards: Engineering and Community Response

Speaker: Dr. Alan Hull, Senior Practice Leader at Golder Associates, Portland OR

5:30 PM - Social Hour
6:30 PM - Dinner
7:30 PM - Presentation

Please RSVP by 4PM on Thursday, October 11, 2018: https://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3631416

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Sep
20
5:30 PM17:30

September AEG-AWG Joint Dinner Meeting

Topic: Masters in Earth & Space Sciences, Applied Geosciences (MESSAGe) Graduate Program at the University of Washington

Speaker: Dr. Juliet Crider, University of Washington - Earth and Space Sciences Department

5:30 PM - Social Hour
6:30 PM - Dinner
7:30 PM - Presentation

Please RSVP by noon on Sep 17, 2018: https://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3606211

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